My new SDR was panicking. She had been on the phone with a prospect for over an hour, and she didn’t know what to do.

I took her headset and introduced myself to the prospect. I looked at their website while talking with them.

He went to the University of Michigan, which is where I grew up. So when he asked me more about it and we talked about what winter was like in Ann Arbor, that conversation turned around enough for us to get a meeting.

Seems irrational, right?

Doesn’t it seem like his decision to meet with us should be based on the quality of our product? Or that he wants a solution for a problem we solve for him?

When we’re meeting someone new, the first question is whether or not they can be trusted.

Trusted sale is the most important part.

Without diversity, other things are not important. With it, you can’t go wrong.

If you have perfect trust, techniques don’t matter. You could do everything else wrong but if you have trust with your employee or coworker then they will be motivated to work hard.

But perfect trust doesn’t exist in a cold call, so we have to live within the grey area between building it while avoiding anything that would lose it.

In this article, we’ll talk about how to make a trusted sale.

  • What not to do when you want to lose someone’s trust.
  • Making a trusted sale is not an easy thing to do, but there are three things you can adopt that will help.

Ways to Lose Trust (4 Things to Avoid)

One of the worst things you can do as a salesperson is to lose trust with your prospects. Here are four ways reps often cause this.

Being Super Salesy

The best way to avoid sounding like a salesperson is by avoiding jargon. It makes you sound unnatural and it’s not the most effective tactic when trying to be authentic.

Related to this article, I recently met a CEO who was frustrated with his company’s lack of diversity in the hiring process. He felt that if he could improve it, then more qualified candidates would be drawn to apply.

When I became a leader, salespeople started calling me all the time. It was clear why studies are finding that huge numbers of salespeople miss their goals.

Here’s what one of our sales calls might sound like:

A lot of salespeople call me and ask if I want to hear about a new lead management software they use.

Who talks like that??

salesy

Here are three types of jargon to avoid, in order not to be that person. If you’re doing any of these things, you’re getting in your own way.

Here are some common words that people use when they’re on the phone with customers. If you ask yourself if these phrases would be used in a friendly conversation, then maybe it’s time to stop using them.

  • When you say “follow up” with someone, it doesn’t mean follow them on social media or call them.
  • I don’t like it when people use “circle back.” It sounds too informal to me.
  • I’m calling – Your prospect knows you’re on the phone with them because they answered. Duh!

Fillers make you seem nervous, and people are more likely to trust you if they think you’re confident.

If you use words that are too difficult for an average person to understand, don’t say it.

Telling Some Lies

It’s easy to lie a little bit early on in the process, but it will hurt you later. This is a big no no if you ever want to make a trusted sale. 

When I first began hiring salespeople, I just assumed pay along with commissions and bonuses would be enough sales motivation.

I had someone tell me that they were told to call by one of my employees. 30 seconds on Slack and I found out it never happened.

If I can’t trust you in the first two minutes, why should I believe what you tell me about your product? Why should I expect anything from you when things don’t go as planned?

I’ve noticed a lot of salespeople using really dumb phrases. I think it might be because they don’t know any better or that their vocabulary is limited to this set of stock phrases.

Not everyone lies. Some people will answer a question when they don’t know the right answer, but prospects are less harsh about this than you might think.

When you buy something, the salesperson isn’t expected to know everything. You can go up and ask them later if they don’t have an answer for you right away.

You’ll gain more trust with your prospects if you admit that sometimes, you don’t know the answer.

Too Many Words

It’s better to say something in fewer words than it is to not.

Using too many words to say something is one of the reasons why people think you’re a fast-talking salesman. Don’t do that!

Our brains are association machines. We can’t just load in facts like Neo from The Matrix, we need to learn through repetition and associating things with one another.

We don’t trust salespeople, because we’ve learned from a young age that they’re usually fast-talking and not to be trusted.

Speak as slowly and concisely as possible.

No Given Value

When I spoke to representatives, they would just talk about their product and not ask me any questions. It was like they assumed that because I’m a salesperson then all of my problems are related to what the company does.

They say it takes seven or eight cold calls to get one warm call, so unless the person is thinking about that problem right then, you’ll have to do all of the work for them.

If you can get your prospect to say that the problem you solve is a priority for them, then they will be more likely to have a good conversation with you.

If it’s not a priority, then you can just move on to the next candidate and save everyone time.

If your audience can’t trust you with two minutes, they won’t trust you for an hour either.

Some companies are taking a different approach to diversity, and they’re trying something new called human-centric problem-solving.

We’ve been lucky at PatientPop because we can see if one of our prospects has a problem that we can solve. If they aren’t showing up for an important search or have a bad online reputation, then it’s clear to us that there is something about their business that needs improvement.

When you’re trying to sell a product, the best thing is if the person on the other line has already experienced your problem. You can do what you have to in order for them to experience it before picking up their phone.

If you don’t have anything valuable to say, then I would rather not hear from you. If your conversation is worthless and a waste of my time, the same applies to me.

3 Ways to Build Customer Trust 

Trust is easy to break, but it’s also very hard to build. You have a lot of work ahead of you if you want people to trust your company.

Building trust with a customer is easy if you use the same techniques as when building friendships. And here’s how: -Be friendly and polite -Listen to them talk about themselves and their problems, without interrupting and giving advice too quickly.

Be Genuine Every SIngle Time

Be yourself! You know when someone is being themselves or not. Even if you are awkward, it’s better to be that way than fake.

Discover a Common Interest

Yuval Harari in his book Sapiens talks about how humans were able to beat other human species like the Neandertals because we’re capable of building communities with more than 150 people.

The ability to create bigger armies and feel safe in new cities has been a positive outcome of our diversity.

The doctor I met with wanted her husband to be at our meeting because she had been burned by half a dozen companies claiming they could help online marketing. She was looking for us to provide something that showed we were different.

He looked me in the eye and I could see he was skeptical of what we were doing — as any husband would be.

I asked him about his background. Where does he live? What school did he go to? He was from Wisconsin and spent summers in Lake Michigan.

Salespeople are having to learn new skills, especially in making trusted sales, in order to be successful.

I grew up in Michigan and spent my summers on Lake Huron. I remember talking about fishing, canoeing, swimming…and what he said to me.

“It’s nice to meet someone who shares my values.”

I watched his skepticism melt away, and I hadn’t even talked about the product yet.

Give Some Value

If you give someone something of value for free, they’re going to think that anything else from the same person is great.

We teach doctors that SEO is more than just targeting the obvious search terms. They’ve hired companies in the past, but they don’t deliver results so when trying to market themselves online, they believe it isn’t worth their time or too competitive.

But most of the time, I can see what’s on their mind. They’re thinking about how other companies have failed and they become better buyers. It makes us look like experts.

Trusting yourself doesn’t solve all your problems, but it does mean you’re getting out of the way.

Building trust with your prospects will make them more likely to buy from you. They’ll feel like they can tell you what’s holding them back, and that creates a better experience for both of us.

That’s just for starters.

Editors Note:

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Justin McGill
About Author: Justin McGill
Justin McGill is the Founder of LeadFuze - a lead generation platform that discovers new leads for you automatically. Get 25 leads free.