The Importance of Company Culture for High-Performing Sales

The culture of a company is everything in sales. More and more companies are focusing on their cultures, especially during the hiring process.

There are a lot of articles about the importance of company culture and how it makes people happy at work.

Separate workplace culture is important for any company to succeed.

Culture is a difficult thing to measure, but it’s not impossible. It doesn’t just happen on its own.

Every company has a culture, and every sales leader can turn theirs into one that is high-performing.

And if you’re looking for a new strategy, don’t worry. You can create one with these 7 habits.


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LeadFuze gives you all the data you need to find ideal leads, including full contact information.

Go through a variety of filters to zero in on the leads you want to reach. This is crazy specific, but you could find all the people that match the following:Ā 

  • A company in the Financial Services or Banking industry
  • Who have more than 10 employees
  • That spend money on Adwords
  • Who use Hubspot
  • Who currently have job openings for marketing help
  • With the role of HR Manager
  • That has only been in this role for less than 1 year
Just to give you an idea. šŸ˜€

7 Must-Have Habits for a High-Performing Sales Culture

  • Your people
  • Clear KPIs
  • Intentional goals
  • Coaching initiative
  • Healthy competition
  • Transparency and visibility
  • Data-driven decision making

1. Building a Sales Team from Scratch Leads to High Performing Sales

Let me tell you the first thing about recruitment and how to build a sales team from scratch.

It’s not enough to have a great company culture; you also need the right people to build a sales team. You can do everything else perfectly, but if you don’t have good people in place, it’s never going to work out.

If you plan to build sales teams, each person should be someone who:

  • Is interested in the work you’re doing together
  • I believe in the vision of my company and will work hard to make that a reality.
  • They share a company’s core values and beliefs.

A CultureIQ report found that employees are most satisfied when the company has a good work environment, support systems in place for them and their needs, and if they feel like they’re working towards something bigger than themselves.

High-Performing Sales

If employees don’t share the company’s passion for their work, they might not be motivated to do a good job.

2. Clear KPIs

Without clear metrics, a sales organization can get out of control.

If everyone on the team understands what success looks like and how to achieve that, then they are more likely to be successful. This means there will be more wins but also a better understanding of company goals.

The definition of clear KPIs is up to the company.

The first step is to set a revenue goal for the team, whether quarterly or annually. Once that’s in place, you can focus on individual goals.

First, figure out where you are falling behind. This might be a good opportunity to use a whiteboard!

After you’ve laid out your opportunity stages, take a moment to:

  • figure out how often people convert from one stage to the next.
  • Determine which activities are the most successful for converting visitors to customers.

Once you know which metrics matter and what activities drive those metrics upward, its important to ensure that your team is focusing on the right things. This will help them improve their performance.

3. Goals that are Intentional is Necessary for High-Performing Sales

Goals need to be specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely in order for them to have a chance of succeeding.

Every sales goal when you create a sales team should be:

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Achievable
  • Relevant
  • Time-Bound

Goals should be structured around the activities and metrics that get everyone closer to The Number. If you don’t have clear KPIs, it’s impossible for your goals to be S.M.A.R.T.

The main idea is to create a routine and make it mandatory for people in the office.

So you’ve got to set the right goals. And make sure they are in balance with each other.

Individual Goals

Individual goals are specific to each salesperson and can be career-driven. For example, an SDR may ask their manager how they might become a more senior position like AE. Their manager will then set individualized goals for them, such as quarterly quotas or objective ones that give the rep clear steps on how they’ll progress in their careers.

Team Goals

Group goals are collaborative in nature and rely on the cooperation of multiple people, such as SDRs or cross-functional pods of AEs, CSMs, and SDRs.

Companies are getting more creative with team goals. These help the teams to work together and achieve something that is great for all of them.

4. A Secret to High-Performing Sales is the Initiative to Coach your Sales Team

The survey shows that companies investing in coaching had a 7 times return on investment and more than one-fourth of participants had an ROI between 10 to 49 times.

Coaching is a very important part of any sales team and can help make your company culture more productive as well.

One of the most important things you can do to motivate your team is to set individual goals for them.

It’s important to focus on your top performers, but don’t forget about the lower 70% of your team. Many sales leaders make the mistake of spending too much time and effort on their high-performing employees, who are already at a point where they have less room for growth.

5. Healthy Competition = High-Performing Sales

People often consider contests, competitions and rewards to be fun stuff. They can help quickly get some quick wins in a short amount of time.

However, if you run your sales competitions the right way and get creative with incentives, they can be a great opportunity to build company culture.

When running competitions, remember that only 25% of your team will have a chance at winning the best most challenges. Your A-team is going to show up, and others won’t be acknowledged if you don’t branch out.

As a leader, your job is to push the high performers and also find ways to keep those in the middle of their careers engaged.

You can do this by running multiple challenges at the same time. For example, you could run a Most Pipeline Generated challenge and also have team-based competitions.

Incentives can be a great way to motivate your employees, but its important not to rely on the same incentives. It may be best to offer something that will really excite and motivate them.

One example is that the company Ambition rents a billboard for an employee who brings in the most yearly contract value during Q3. The winner of this reward gets to choose where and what content goes on it.

I want to share with you some of the strategies I’ve used that have worked for me.

6. Transparency

As a sales leader, you need to know how your employees are doing and where they stand. But it’s also important for them to have access so that they understand their own performance.

Transparency is an incredible motivator, but it’s more than that. Transparency promotes trust and alignment on your team.

If you can make sure people understand what is going on, and if possible show them visually, they will be more engaged.

These initiatives help the reps feel like they’re part of a team, and also makes them more confident on their own.

7. Decision Making Driven by Data

Data and people are not mutually exclusive, so it is important to use metrics as a motivation tool.

Giving reps access to data and clear information helps them be more comfortable in their job, whether they’re hitting quota or not.

Managers no longer have to guess and hope they guessed right. They know when intervention is needed early on in order to help their teams focus on hitting the number, which improves work for everyone.

The Bottom Line

Successful sales leaders know there is no silver bullet, but it’s a process that must be measured and monitored.

If you put these habits in place and commit to them, your employees will be happier and more productive.

When I first began hiring salespeople, I just assumed pay along with commissions and bonuses would be enough motivation for them. With my first salespeople, I made the mistake of constantly testing pay and commission structure. I felt that with enough base pay and lucrative commissions, it would be enough motivation for them. More companies are focused on diversity during the hiring process. If you implement these 7 essential habits into your company culture, then expect high-performing sales employees who want to stay.


Need Help Automating Your Sales Prospecting Process?

LeadFuze gives you all the data you need to find ideal leads, including full contact information.

Go through a variety of filters to zero in on the leads you want to reach. This is crazy specific, but you could find all the people that match the following:Ā 

  • A company in the Financial Services or Banking industry
  • Who have more than 10 employees
  • That spend money on Adwords
  • Who use Hubspot
  • Who currently have job openings for marketing help
  • With the role of HR Manager
  • That has only been in this role for less than 1 year
Just to give you an idea. šŸ˜€

Editors Note:

Want to help contribute to future articles? Have data-backed and tactical advice to share? Iā€™d love to hear from you!

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Justin McGill
About Author: Justin McGill
Justin McGill is the Founder of LeadFuze - a lead generation platform that discovers new leads for you automatically. Get 25 leads free.