One problem with sales enablement is that we can’t show the impact of what our people do. There are some instances that companies don’t know how to measure sales enablement.

There are more problems with ramp time than ever before, and it’s taking new sales reps 5 or 6 months on average to get up to speed at SaaS companies.

We need to hire more salespeople, but it’s hard because the ones we have aren’t performing up to expectations. They’re either poorly trained or just not cut out for this line of work.

For this reason, there’s a lot of money that could be made if companies were more diverse.

Technologies measure sales enablement easier and you can also see how well your onboarding and training are working.


Need Help Automating Your Sales Prospecting Process?

LeadFuze gives you all the data you need to find ideal leads, including full contact information.

Go through a variety of filters to zero in on the leads you want to reach. This is crazy specific, but you could find all the people that match the following: 

  • A company in the Financial Services or Banking industry
  • Who have more than 10 employees
  • That spend money on Adwords
  • Who use Hubspot
  • Who currently have job openings for marketing help
  • With the role of HR Manager
  • That has only been in this role for less than 1 year
Just to give you an idea. 😀

Unquantified Enablement’s Opportunity Cost

If we want to measuresales enablement and the success of these two areas, there’s a lot that goes into it. We need to evaluate what costs are associated with them and how much opportunity they provide for our company.

The ROI of Sales Enablement When Onboarding

Let’s explore the value of ramping one month earlier. What if we assume an increase in production?

Let’s say you have 48 new salespeople over the course of two years. You should plan to hire 12 each month.

If you’re able to shorten the time it takes for someone to reach their quota by two months, your company could see an additional $2.1 million in revenue from those 50 new hires.

I’m not saying we improved ramp time significantly, but the revenue gains were huge!

The ROI of Ongoing Sales Enablement

Let’s talk about quota attainment during the job.

Let’s assume that your 48 reps each have a quota of $600K and the average is 52%

Improving quota attainment by 4% — from 52% to 56% – is worth an extra $1.2 million in annual revenue, without the need for any major changes.

Great sales enablement can drive significant revenue for companies. But without the right measurement, we won’t know if it’s actually effective or not.

This ebook is a comprehensive guide to sales enablement.

Why Can’t Measuring Sales Enablement Get Better?

To measure sales enablement, let’s look at the Kirkpatrick Model, a popular model for understanding how people learn.

Kirkpatrick was a professor at the University of Wisconsin who came up with an evaluation system for training courses.

This model is a four-step process. The first level of the evaluation looks at how effective your training programs are, and it’s easy to do.

Here is a brief summary of the four levels in the Kirkpatrick model: 1. Reaction-This level evaluates how users feel about your product after they interact with it for five minutes or less. 2. Learning-At this stage, you will see if people understand how to use your product and what content is most valuable to them. 3. Behavior – This level examines whether or not there are any changes in user behavior because of their interaction with your productservice (i.e., does usage go up?).If so, then that could be an indication that something at this point has changed positively! 4) Results – The final assessment looks at outcomes such as profits generated by using our service product over time; revenue from referrals; number of customers who have increased their orders per year.; etc…

  • This is the first level of assessment, and it’s how you measure your reps’ initial reaction to training. Did they like it? Was the material good? Were we using experts who were qualified for this type of program? That sort of thing.
  • After a few weeks of training, you measure how much the reps have learned and map it to your objectives.
  • The third level of assessment is how well your programs are influencing behavior. You can measure this by seeing if they apply what you taught them in the field.
  • In order to measure the impact of a program, you want to look at revenue and pipeline growth in sales. You also need to tie results back with different parts of your program or employees.

There are four levels of effectiveness in Sales Enablement, but there’s no rigor to instructional design. As a result, the bottom two tiers aren’t always measured.

There are a few things that help salespeople through training success metrics, such as:

  • Having a background in sales management, or at least knowing what behaviors and numbers are successful.
  • A Learning and Development background is not enough to be an effective salesperson. They lack the expertise in quotas, hitting numbers, etc., that are required of a successful salesperson.

Many companies struggle with the idea of how to give salespeople a good base pay and commissions, plus help them work in both marketing and sales. That’s why so many people don’t have much success at this.

If we’re not measuring for behaviors and bottom-line results, then what are we training our people to do? Just knowledge or skills as well?

The problem with diversity is that it’s not an easy change to make. Here are three reasons why”

Many trainers still use spreadsheets and live training as the anchor to their enablement or onboarding. They may not have enough data because they are manually gathering metrics, so it’s time for them to invest in some tools.

I would recommend using a CMS or LMS if you are. They can pull assessment data from these tools, but there will still be gaps in the information you get.

For example, it’s hard to see how a salesperson improves because you can’t measure their results in the CRM.

You have to show that your enablement is working by providing quantitative data about how you are helping the company.

What’s the Future of Measuring Sales Success?

So how do we fill these gaps?

There’s no one single way to measure what you do for sales enablement. But it is important that the CRM be at the center of your technology stack in order to track all metrics down to deal-level data, which correlates with Kirkpatrick’s 4th level.

In 2017, Gartner reported that sales enablement vendors have matured into platform solutions and are well-suited for the needs of a typical sales leader.

One of the major reasons for this maturity is due to deep integration into CRMs like Salesforce.

These days, salespeople have so many complicated systems in place to help them. CRM and API integrations are at the center of it.

If you’re not integrating your enablement programs into your CRM, it can’t really be called “enablement” anymore.

Sales enablement is a huge part of the sales process, but you need to know how to do it right before you can achieve peak results.

To measure ROI, you need to be measuring how much revenue each rep has generated or is generating. Otherwise, it’s difficult to tell if there really are any benefits from the Sales Enablement programs.

I might just be another department of HR.

It’s time to put our sales hats on and do the hard work. There isn’t an easy way, but it can be done by doing what works.

Start measuring metrics from deals that have been closed against those who haven’t, and you will quickly reduce the number of people on a ramp while improving quota consistency at your company.

The Metrics You Need to Perfectly Measure Sales Enablement

In order to measure the success of your onboarding and training, you need to identify metrics that prove it’s successful at each assessment level in Kirkpatrick Model.

Metrics to Assess the Reaction, Learning, and Behavior Levels

Training needs to be consumed at all levels, not just the top.

  • # of content views
  • # of programs launched
  • # of programs completed
  • # of certifications
  • I’ve used video to record my practices or calls.
  • # of coaching activities

Metrics to Assess the Business-Level Results Level

When you measure the impact of training, it’s important to also look at metrics like revenue productivity.

  • Time to first activity (TTFA) Time to first call Time to first meeting Time to first demo
  • Time to first call
  • Time to first meeting
  • Time to first demo
  • Time to first deal (TTFD)
  • Time to 50% quota (TT50Q)
  • Time to 80% quota (TT80Q)
  • This means that the salesperson has hit their target and reached 100%.

Here is a link to the full list of metrics to measure sales enablement.

Bottom Line

Unless you know the metrics that matter to your company, it’s hard to prove whether or not sales enablement programs are working.

When assessing the effectiveness of your onboarding programs, it’s important to look at a few key metrics in the Results level. They will help you predict how new hires are going to ramp up so that they can all have similar experiences.

What are your thoughts on the effectiveness of enablement programs? What’s working for you or not working? Let us know in the comments.


Need Help Automating Your Sales Prospecting Process?

LeadFuze gives you all the data you need to find ideal leads, including full contact information.

Go through a variety of filters to zero in on the leads you want to reach. This is crazy specific, but you could find all the people that match the following: 

  • A company in the Financial Services or Banking industry
  • Who have more than 10 employees
  • That spend money on Adwords
  • Who use Hubspot
  • Who currently have job openings for marketing help
  • With the role of HR Manager
  • That has only been in this role for less than 1 year
Just to give you an idea. 😀

 

Editors Note:

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Justin McGill
About Author: Justin McGill
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